You are here: Home / Research / Books / Reconstruction's Desegregation Debate: The Politics of Equality and the Rhetoric of Place, 1870-1875.

Reconstruction's Desegregation Debate: The Politics of Equality and the Rhetoric of Place, 1870-1875.

In the decade that followed the Civil War, two questions dominated political debate: To what degree were African Americans now “equal” to white Americans, and how should this equality be implemented in law? Although Republicans entertained multiple, even contradictory, answers to these questions, the party committed itself to several civil rights initiatives. When Congress passed the Thirteenth Amendment, the 1866 Civil Rights Act, the Fourteenth Amendment, and the Fifteenth Amendment, it justified these decisions with a broad egalitarian rhetoric. This rhetoric altered congressional culture, instituting new norms that made equality not merely an ideal, but rather a pragmatic aim for political judgments.
5/1/02
Reconstruction's Desegregation Debate: The Politics of Equality and the Rhetoric of Place, 1870-1875. East Lansing: Michigan State Press, 2002. 276 pgs., incl. bib. and index.
Contents

There are currently no items in this folder.