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Events, Activities and Speaker Announcements.

CAS Club/Fall Involvement Fair

The CAS Club officers will have a table with information about our major and the club. Please stop by and encourage all of your students to attend.
When Aug 27, 2014
from 11:00 AM to 04:00 PM
Where Alumni Hall, HUB-Robeson Center
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Colloquium Presents: "Revisiting the Role of Fear in the Extended Parallel Process Model"

When Sep 05, 2014
from 03:35 PM to 05:00 PM
Where 262 Willard
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Abstract

Fear was theorized to have the central role in Witte's (1992) Extended Parallel Process Model (EPPM) of message effects.  In the time since the theory’s articulation, fear has receded into an appendage role in the EPPM literature, primarily due to a lack of supportive empirical evidence.  Relegating fear to a minor role arguably nullifies any novel contribution or advantage the EPPM might have over its predecessors.  Moreover, disregarding the role of fear is premature in the absence of studies that more precisely evaluate the claims advanced by the EPPM.  It is argued that the problems lie in the between-individual approach to fear that is prevalent within previous research.  A within-individual approach to fear is proposed to give the EPPM a fair and proper test, focusing on fear reduction (or lack thereof) as is explicated in its original theorization. A study is reported in which the major EPPM hypotheses are tested using a research design that adopts the within-individual approach and measures fear multiple times across message exposure.

 

Colloquium Presents: "On Canned Laughter, or, the Speech Ethic of an Affective Object"

When Sep 08, 2014
from 02:30 PM to 04:00 PM
Where 107 Electrical Engineering West
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Abstract

In this presentation it is argued that the example of (canned) laughter continues to trouble the human/machine binary that so many have troubled, from Descartes to Zupančič.  Sounding various objects of “recorded” laughter through psychoanalytic tweets, deconstructive warps, and object-oriented woofers implicates ontology as so much noise for the projection of certainty.  Derivatively speaking, It is argued for the primacy of a rhetorical ethic.

The McCourtney Institute for Democracy Roundtable Presents : "The State of Political Communication Research"

Featured Guest: Thomas Patterson (Harvard University Kennedy School of Government)
When Sep 09, 2014
from 11:30 AM to 12:30 PM
Where 124 Sparks
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The McCourtney Institute for Democracy Presents a Public Lecture: "Feeding the Fire: The Media's Role in Party Polarization"

Presented by: Thomas Patterson, Harvard University
When Sep 09, 2014
from 04:30 PM to 06:00 PM
Where Foster Auditorium
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Abstract

Political polarization has become a defining feature of American politics. The signs are everywhere, from policy deadlock in Washington to scathing TV ads on the campaign trail. The roots of this development lie in our politics, particularly the partisan realignment that took place after the collapse of the New Deal coalition.

The media have helped fuel the rise of political polarization. The “new” media system that has emerged from the rise of cable television, the elimination of the Fairness Doctrine, the decline of traditional news outlets, and the proliferation of political websites is far different from the “old” system. It’s a system where information outlets have a strong incentive to distort partisan differences and appeal to partisan bias.

The story of the media’s contribution goes beyond the story of Fox News, MSNBC, and partisan talk show hosts. We—the citizens—are part of the story. We have a preference for information that confirms our political biases and a stubborn resistance to disconfirming evidence.

The combination of polarizing messages and human nature has proven to be toxic. The American public has become increasingly misinformed about public affairs. Citizens’ versions of reality are increasingly divorced from the facts, confounding efforts to get our politics back on track.

Bio

Thomas E. Patterson is Bradlee Professor of Government and the Press at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. Before coming to Harvard in 1996, he taught for more than two decades at Syracuse University’s Maxwell School of Citizenship.

His most recent book, Informing the News (2013), explains the decline in the quality of news information and what could be done to strengthen it. A past book, The Vanishing Voter (2003), looks at the causes and consequences of declining electoral participation. His book on the media's political role, Out of Order (1993), received the American Political Science Association’s Graber Award for best book in political communication of the previous decade. An earlier book, The Unseeing Eye (1976), was named by the American Association for Public Opinion Research as one of the 50 most influential books on public opinion in the past half-century. He also is author of Mass Media Election (1980), which received a Choice Award, and two general American government texts, The American Democracy (now in its 11th edition) and We the People (now in its 10th edition).

His research has been funded by Carnegie, Ford, Markle, Knight, Smith-Richardson, Pew, and the National Science Foundation. His current project, funded by a grant from the Carnegie and Knight foundations, is aimed at strengthening journalism practice and education.

The McCourtney Institute for Democracy Roundtable Presents : "Democracy and Deliberation in the K-12 Classroom"

Featured Guest: Walter Parker (U Washington College of Education)
When Sep 12, 2014
from 12:00 PM to 01:00 PM
Where 124 Sparks
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Colloquium Presents: "Rhetorical Studies in the Late Age of Fossil Fuels"

When Sep 12, 2014
from 03:35 PM to 05:00 PM
Where 262 Willard
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Abstract

Since the industrial revolution, the world has been shaped profoundly by the fossil fuel industry. Yet, the era dominated by coal, oil, and gas is ending, one way or another. To consider what this transformation might entail for rhetorical studies, this talk focuses on two defining public discourses of our times: (1) the posthuman, a cultural-philosophical term naming the transformation of human capacity through technology; and (2) the anthropocene, a geopolitical term naming a period when humans have become a dominant influence on the environment. Although both increasingly are popular topics, they rarely—if ever—are addressed together. Despite their contradictory messages regarding human agency, it is argued both discourses are emblematic of the late age of fossil fuels. This talk engages two voices of social movements that are relevant to each: reproductive environmental health and climate justice. Both advocates mourn ecological crises, protest conditions of living in these times, and challenge audiences to collectively respond. Inspired by these critiques, this talk aims to prompt discussion about significant choices the field of rhetorical studies faces today in terms of: who or what we believe has agency; how we conduct research; and the ways we might strengthen our ethical democratic relations.

Health Communication Brownbag

Introductions all around and overview of the year
When Sep 15, 2014
from 01:15 PM to 02:15 PM
Where 124 Sparks
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Colloquium: New Grad Student

When Sep 19, 2014
from 03:30 PM to 05:00 PM
Where 262 Willard
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Health Communication Brownbag Presents: "Communicating to Save Lives: Lessons Learned About the Intersection of Culture and Health in West African Contexts"

Featured Guest: Khadi Ndiaye, Assistant Professor of Global Health and Co-Director - Global Health Communication Program, The George Washington University
When Sep 22, 2014
from 01:15 PM to 02:15 PM
Where 124 Sparks
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Bio:

Khadidiatou Ndiaye (PhD, The Pennsylvania State University, 2008) is an Assistant Professor of Global Health and the Co-Director, Global Health Communication Program at the Milken Institute School of Public Health & Health Services at George Washington University.

Dr. Ndiaye’s work centers on issues of health, culture, and international communication. She explores how culture impacts the fundamental understanding of health in communities throughout the world. She is also interested in addressing the inherent methodological and procedural challenges of international health research (both from researchers’ and participants’ standpoints).

The McCourtney Institute for Democracy Roundtable Presents : "Democracy and Desire: Theoretical Underpinnings of Democracy in Ancient Athens"

Featured Guest: Mark Munn (Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies)
When Sep 23, 2014
from 11:30 AM to 12:30 PM
Where 124 Sparks
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The McCourtney Institute for Democracy Presents a Public Lecture: "Watch the Throne: The Promises and Perils of Covering Presidential Power"

Presented by: Charlie Savage, Reporter - New York Times
When Sep 23, 2014
from 04:00 PM to 05:30 PM
Where Paterno Library, Foster Auditorium
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Abstract

Since the 9/11 terrorist attacks, Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama have overseen a series of extraordinary national security policies including targeted killings, National Security Agency surveillance, detention without trial, and more. The pervasive secrecy that the executive branch has draped over these policies – and a secret body of law it has written to authorize and govern many of them – has raised the importance of investigative journalism. But an unprecedented wave of leak prosecutions, fueled in part by new technology that has made it far easier for the government to identify who is talking to journalists, is chilling potential sources of unauthorized disclosures for public consumption. The result is a defining challenge to democratic accountability amid an era of seemingly endless war.

Bio

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Charlie Savage is a Washington correspondent for the New York Times. A native of Fort Wayne, Indiana, Savage graduated summa cum laude from Harvard College in 1998 and later earned a master's degree from Yale Law School while on a Knight Foundation journalism fellowship. He began his career as a local government and politics reporter for the Miami Herald, and covered national legal affairs for the Boston Globe from 2003 to 2008 before moving to the Times. Savage lives in Washington, D.C., with his wife, the journalist Luiza Ch. Savage of Maclean's Magazine, and their sons, William and Peter.

Savage's work on presidential power and other legal policy matters has been widely recognized. His articles in the Boston Globe received the Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting, the American Bar Association's Silver Gavel Award, and the Gerald R. Ford Prize for Distinguished Reporting on the Presidency. Savage's book about the growth of executive power, Takeover, was named one of the best books of 2007 by The Washington Post, Slate, and Esquire. The book also received the bipartisan Constitution Project's inaugural Award for Constitutional Commentary, the NCTE George Orwell Award for Distinguished Contribution to Honesty and Clarity in Public Language (pdf), and the New York Public Library's Helen Bernstein Book Award for Excellence in Journalism.

Colloquium Presents: "Targeting Weight Management to Reduce Cancer Risk: Investigating the Influence of Nutrition Messages on Judgement and Decision Making"

When Sep 26, 2014
from 03:35 PM to 05:00 PM
Where 262 Willard
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Abstract:

A wealth of epidemiological research shows that certain modifiable health behaviors are linked to an increased cancer risk. Yet, many people struggle with or are unable to modify their behaviors. Diet and nutrition is a particular concern here in the US.  For many Americans, eating fewer calories and losing weight is challenging. An astonishing 69% of adults over age 20 are overweight.  Extra weight is associated with an increased risk of developing a number of cancers. The National Cancer Institute estimates that existing obesity trends will lead to approximately 500,000 additional cases of cancer by 2030. In the face of this problem, there is encouraging evidence that even a small reduction in weight can offer health benefits. If every overweight adult reduced their body mass index by just 1%, a weight loss of approximately two pounds, 100,000 new cases of cancer could be avoided. If a small reduction in weight can reduce cancer risk, it is noteworthy to examine how individuals evaluate food products and ultimately how they make dietary choices. Today, our food packages are covered with information.  Messages include a government regulated nutrition facts label as well as claims that are placed on packages to guide consumers. I will present results from two studies. In Study 1, eye-tracking technology was used to measure the degree to which individuals pay visual attention to the information contained in nutrition facts labels and front-of-package symbols.  In Study 2, an experimental design was utilized to explore consequences related to the recent trend of placing the term “natural” on front-of-package claims. The broader implications for communication science, message design, and public policy will be discussed.

Health Communication Brownbag Presents: "Hope for Change? Hope Appeals in Environmental and Health Communication"

Featured Guest: Amy Chadwick, Assistant Professor - School of Communication Studies, Scripps College of Communication
When Sep 29, 2014
from 01:15 PM to 02:15 PM
Where 124 Sparks
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Health Communication Brownbag Presents: "Twitter Conversations about Ebola"

Presented By: Donna Coffman, PhD, Research Association Professor, The Methodology Center, Penn State & Rachel Smith, PhD, Associate Professor, Communication Arts & Sciences, Penn State
When Oct 13, 2014
from 01:15 PM to 02:15 PM
Where 124 Sparks
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The McCourtney Institute for Democracy Roundtable Presents : "PlastiDuditude: Harry Shearer’s Democratic Voices"

Featured Guest: Rosa Eberly (Penn State CAS and ENGL)
When Oct 14, 2014
from 11:30 AM to 12:30 PM
Where 124 Sparks
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Health Communication Brownbag Presents: "Exploring Thrombophilia Survivors’ Experiences and Emotions"

Presented By: Roxanne Parrott, PhD, Distinguished Professor, Department of Communication Arts & Sciences, Penn State
When Oct 20, 2014
from 01:15 PM to 02:15 PM
Where 124 Sparks
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CAPR Brownbag

Details TBD
When Oct 22, 2014
from 12:00 AM to 12:00 AM
Where 302 Pond
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Brown Medal Award Ceremony

Presentation by Josh Lerner - Executive Director, Participatory Budgeting Project
When Oct 25, 2014
from 04:00 PM to 05:30 PM
Where Nittany Lion Inn - Ballroom AB
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Health Communication Brownbag Presents: "The Collaborative Management of Information Problems in Hospitals"

Presented By: Alison Murphy, ABD, College of Information Sciences and Technology, Penn State
When Oct 27, 2014
from 01:15 PM to 02:15 PM
Where 124 Sparks
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