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Penn State Speech & Debate Society Presents a Debate: A Privacy Amendment Should be Added to the Constitution

Co-Sponsored By: Center for Democratic Deliberation, Department of Communication Arts & Sciences, Office of Undergraduate Education, Penn State Law, Student Affairs, Penn State University Libraries.
When Sep 17, 2014
from 02:30 PM to 04:00 PM
Where 102 Paterno Library, Foster Auditorium
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Due to the generosity of the Office of Undergraduate Education and Penn State University Libraries, we will be giving away free pocket Constitutions to everyone who attends the debate. To commemorate the day, the Pattee and Paterno Library will have a book exhibit of works pertaining to the Constitution, and Penn State Law is organizing a voter registration drive for students. We encourage everyone who plan to attend the debate to also take part in these other festivities. This event is free and open to the public.
Come Celebrate Constitution Day! Speeches from Audience Members are Welcome!

Colloquium: New Grad Student

When Sep 19, 2014
from 03:30 PM to 05:00 PM
Where 262 Willard
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Health Communication Brownbag Presents: "Communicating to Save Lives: Lessons Learned About the Intersection of Culture and Health in West African Contexts"

Featured Guest: Khadi Ndiaye, Assistant Professor of Global Health and Co-Director - Global Health Communication Program, The George Washington University
When Sep 22, 2014
from 01:15 PM to 02:15 PM
Where 124 Sparks
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Bio:

Khadidiatou Ndiaye (PhD, The Pennsylvania State University, 2008) is an Assistant Professor of Global Health and the Co-Director, Global Health Communication Program at the Milken Institute School of Public Health & Health Services at George Washington University.

Dr. Ndiaye’s work centers on issues of health, culture, and international communication. She explores how culture impacts the fundamental understanding of health in communities throughout the world. She is also interested in addressing the inherent methodological and procedural challenges of international health research (both from researchers’ and participants’ standpoints).

The McCourtney Institute for Democracy Roundtable Presents : "Democracy and Desire: Theoretical Underpinnings of Democracy in Ancient Athens"

Featured Guest: Mark Munn (Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies)
When Sep 23, 2014
from 11:30 AM to 12:30 PM
Where 124 Sparks
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The McCourtney Institute for Democracy Presents a Public Lecture: "Watch the Throne: The Promises and Perils of Covering Presidential Power"

Presented by: Charlie Savage, Reporter - New York Times
When Sep 23, 2014
from 04:00 PM to 05:30 PM
Where Paterno Library, Foster Auditorium
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Abstract

Since the 9/11 terrorist attacks, Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama have overseen a series of extraordinary national security policies including targeted killings, National Security Agency surveillance, detention without trial, and more. The pervasive secrecy that the executive branch has draped over these policies – and a secret body of law it has written to authorize and govern many of them – has raised the importance of investigative journalism. But an unprecedented wave of leak prosecutions, fueled in part by new technology that has made it far easier for the government to identify who is talking to journalists, is chilling potential sources of unauthorized disclosures for public consumption. The result is a defining challenge to democratic accountability amid an era of seemingly endless war.

Bio

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Charlie Savage is a Washington correspondent for the New York Times. A native of Fort Wayne, Indiana, Savage graduated summa cum laude from Harvard College in 1998 and later earned a master's degree from Yale Law School while on a Knight Foundation journalism fellowship. He began his career as a local government and politics reporter for the Miami Herald, and covered national legal affairs for the Boston Globe from 2003 to 2008 before moving to the Times. Savage lives in Washington, D.C., with his wife, the journalist Luiza Ch. Savage of Maclean's Magazine, and their sons, William and Peter.

Savage's work on presidential power and other legal policy matters has been widely recognized. His articles in the Boston Globe received the Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting, the American Bar Association's Silver Gavel Award, and the Gerald R. Ford Prize for Distinguished Reporting on the Presidency. Savage's book about the growth of executive power, Takeover, was named one of the best books of 2007 by The Washington Post, Slate, and Esquire. The book also received the bipartisan Constitution Project's inaugural Award for Constitutional Commentary, the NCTE George Orwell Award for Distinguished Contribution to Honesty and Clarity in Public Language (pdf), and the New York Public Library's Helen Bernstein Book Award for Excellence in Journalism.

Colloquium Presents: "Targeting Weight Management to Reduce Cancer Risk: Investigating the Influence of Nutrition Messages on Judgement and Decision Making"

When Sep 26, 2014
from 03:35 PM to 05:00 PM
Where 262 Willard
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Abstract:

A wealth of epidemiological research shows that certain modifiable health behaviors are linked to an increased cancer risk. Yet, many people struggle with or are unable to modify their behaviors. Diet and nutrition is a particular concern here in the US.  For many Americans, eating fewer calories and losing weight is challenging. An astonishing 69% of adults over age 20 are overweight.  Extra weight is associated with an increased risk of developing a number of cancers. The National Cancer Institute estimates that existing obesity trends will lead to approximately 500,000 additional cases of cancer by 2030. In the face of this problem, there is encouraging evidence that even a small reduction in weight can offer health benefits. If every overweight adult reduced their body mass index by just 1%, a weight loss of approximately two pounds, 100,000 new cases of cancer could be avoided. If a small reduction in weight can reduce cancer risk, it is noteworthy to examine how individuals evaluate food products and ultimately how they make dietary choices. Today, our food packages are covered with information.  Messages include a government regulated nutrition facts label as well as claims that are placed on packages to guide consumers. I will present results from two studies. In Study 1, eye-tracking technology was used to measure the degree to which individuals pay visual attention to the information contained in nutrition facts labels and front-of-package symbols.  In Study 2, an experimental design was utilized to explore consequences related to the recent trend of placing the term “natural” on front-of-package claims. The broader implications for communication science, message design, and public policy will be discussed.

Health Communication Brownbag Presents: "Hope for Change? Hope Appeals in Environmental and Health Communication"

Featured Guest: Amy Chadwick, Assistant Professor - School of Communication Studies, Scripps College of Communication
When Sep 29, 2014
from 01:15 PM to 02:15 PM
Where 124 Sparks
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Abstract:

Hope has the potential to be a powerful motivator for influencing attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors. However, much of hope’s potential is unrealized. Dr. Chadwick will define hope in a persuasive context and will describe the creation of messages that evoke hope (hope appeals). She will present findings from several studies that have examined hope appeals in the context of climate change communication and discuss the implication of these studies for the role of hope appeals in environmental and health communication. Dr. Chadwick looks forward to an engaging discussion about the future of hope appeals.

Bio:

Amy E. Chadwick (PhD, Communication Arts and Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University) is an Assistant Professor of Communication Studies in the Scripps College of Communication at Ohio University. Her research focuses on the use of communication messages to change attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors related to health and environmental issues. She is particularly interested in how positive emotions, such as hope, can be used to promote pro-social change in a variety of contexts.

Health Communication Brownbag Presents: "Choosing a Career in Public Health"

Featured Guest: Melanie Williams, Branch Manager, Texas Cancer Registry, Cancer Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, Texas Department of State Health Services
When Oct 06, 2014
from 01:15 PM to 02:15 PM
Where 124 Sparks
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Bio

Melanie Williams, Ph.D., is the Manager of the Cancer Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, Texas Cancer Registry at the Texas Department of State Health Services. For the past fourteen years, Dr. Williams has served the Texas Cancer Registry in various capacities including Senior Epidemiologist and cancer cluster epidemiologist. Prior to the Texas Cancer Registry, she held positions in Health Care Quality and Standards and Vital Statistics. She actively serves on national cancer registry committees including the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries Education and Communication Committees, and co-chairs the Physician Reporting Workgroup.

Dr. Williams has Bachelor and Master of Arts degrees in Communication and Public Address, and Communication Studies from the University of North Texas, and a PhD from the University of Georgia where she specialized in health communication and statistical research methods.

She has co-authored a variety of publications, including the 2006 Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, and Cancer Incidence in US Hispanic/Latinos, the first and most comprehensive national reports on cancers in U.S. Latinos. Recent co-authored publications include “Muddy water? Variation in reporting receipt of breast cancer radiation therapy by population-based tumor registries” in the July 2013 issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics, and “All-Cancers Mortality Rates Approaching Diseases of the Heart Mortality Rates as Leading Cause of Death in Texas,” published in the January 2014 of the Southern Medical Journal.

She lives in Austin, Texas, and most enjoys spending time with her husband, son, and two cats.

Health Communication Brownbag Presents: "Twitter Conversations about Ebola"

Presented By: Donna Coffman, PhD, Research Association Professor, The Methodology Center, Penn State & Rachel Smith, PhD, Associate Professor, Communication Arts & Sciences, Penn State
When Oct 13, 2014
from 01:15 PM to 02:15 PM
Where 124 Sparks
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The McCourtney Institute for Democracy Roundtable Presents : "PlastiDuditude: Harry Shearer’s Democratic Voices"

Featured Guest: Rosa Eberly (Penn State CAS and ENGL)
When Oct 14, 2014
from 11:30 AM to 12:30 PM
Where 131 Sparks
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Health Communication Brownbag Presents: "Exploring Thrombophilia Survivors’ Experiences and Emotions"

Presented By: Roxanne Parrott, PhD, Distinguished Professor, Department of Communication Arts & Sciences, Penn State
When Oct 20, 2014
from 01:15 PM to 02:15 PM
Where 124 Sparks
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CAPR Brownbag

Details TBD
When Oct 22, 2014
from 12:00 AM to 12:00 AM
Where 302 Pond
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Brown Medal Award Ceremony

Presentation by Josh Lerner - Executive Director, Participatory Budgeting Project
When Oct 25, 2014
from 04:00 PM to 05:30 PM
Where Nittany Lion Inn - Ballroom AB
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Health Communication Brownbag Presents: "The Collaborative Management of Information Problems in Hospitals"

Presented By: Alison Murphy, ABD, College of Information Sciences and Technology, Penn State
When Oct 27, 2014
from 01:15 PM to 02:15 PM
Where 124 Sparks
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Public Debate: Hosting the Bristish National Debate Team

Hosted by: The Penn State Speech & Debate Society
When Oct 28, 2014
from 05:30 PM to 07:00 PM
Where Foster Auditorium
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The McCourtney Institute for Democracy Roundtable Presents : "The Challenge of Practicing Democracy in Small Groups"

Featured Guest: John Gastil (Communication Arts & Sciences and Political Science)
When Oct 30, 2014
from 11:30 AM to 12:30 PM
Where 124 Sparks
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Health Communication Brownbag Presents: Health Communication Research Unplugged

What Brownbag Members Have Been up to This Semester; Readings on Angel
When Nov 03, 2014
from 01:15 PM to 02:15 PM
Where 124 Sparks
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The McCourtney Institute for Democracy Roundtable Presents : "Reflections on the 2014 elections"

Featured Guest: TBD
When Nov 05, 2014
from 12:00 PM to 01:00 PM
Where 124 Sparks
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The McCourtney Institute for Democracy Presents a Public Lecture: "School's Out: Higher Education, Polarization, and the Demise of the American Dream"

Presented By: Suzanne Mettler, Clinton Rossiter Professor of American Institutions in the Government Department, Cornell University
When Nov 06, 2014
from 04:00 PM to 05:30 PM
Where 101 Thomas Building
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Abstract

When it comes to discussions about rising college costs, attention is often directed squarely at college and university leaders, but federal and state policymakers also play an enormous role in providing individuals with the ability to afford college. In recent decades policymakers have abdicated their responsibility for ensuring an affordable, accountable and high quality postsecondary system of higher education in the U.S., slowly dismantling a legacy in which earlier generations of lawmakers made higher education a pillar of the nation’s economic, social and civic foundation. How and why has this failure of public duty taken place? And what specific actions can Americans take to encourage a renewal of political leadership in stewarding American higher education?

Bio

Suzanne Mettler is the Clinton Rossiter Professor of American Institutions in the Government Department at Cornell University. She is the author of Degrees of Inequality: How Higher Education Politics Sabotaged the American Dream (Basic Books, 2014); The Submerged State: How Invisible Government Programs Undermine American Democracy (University of Chicago, 2011); Dividing Citizens: Gender and Federalism In New Deal Public Policy (Cornell, 1998), which was awarded the Kammerer Award of the American Political Science Association (APSA) for the best book on US national policy and the Martha Derthick Award for a book that has made an enduring contribution to the study of federalism; and Soldiers to Citizens: The G.I. Bill and the Making of the Greatest Generation (Oxford University Press, 2005), which was also awarded the Kammerer Award as well as the J. David Greenstone prize of the Politics and History section of the APSA.  Mettler has also published in the American Political Science Review, Perspectives on Politics, British Journal of Political Science, Studies in American Political Development, and Journal of Health Policy, Politics, and Law, and in other scholarly journals and edited volumes, as well as op-eds in the New York Times and LA Times, and essays in The Washington Monthly and Salon. She serves on the national steering committee of the Scholars Strategy Network

Health Communication Brownbag Presents: "Exploring the Effects of Typicality in Narratives on Users’ Interpretations of Risk Messages"

Presented By: Jiangxue (Ashley) Han, ABD, College of Communications, Penn State
When Nov 10, 2014
from 01:15 PM to 02:15 PM
Where 124 Sparks
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